The BCEC Art Collection

lillypond-for-web-john-olsen

‘Queensland Lily Pond’ –  By John Olsen

The spectacular images and bold colours of one of Australia’s most significant and accomplished artists, John Olsen, have been adapted onto the onto the terrazzo floor of the Centre’s foyer from his painting ‘Queensland Lily Pond’.

The Olsen work, in its predominant position in the Centre’s main entrance, has become acknowledged as an integral component of the Centre’s signature and an appropriate recognition of the Centre’s collection of important works.

Plaza Gallery

The Centre takes pride in furthering and promoting interest in Australian Indigenous art and from its earliest days has built one of the most significant collections of Central Desert Art. This museum quality collection of Indigenous art is currently on display in the Centre’s permanent art space – the Plaza Gallery.

Read more about the collection and view gallery →

Plaza Ballroom

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre’s signature gala event space – the Plaza Ballroom – home to the majority of Brisbane’s premier gala and celebrity events, now proudly showcases what is perhaps the largest artwork on display in Australia. A painting by the highly regarded Aboriginal artist, Dorothy Napangardi, has been reproduced on to the Ballroom’s new carpet to great effect.

Read more and view gallery →

Grey Street

Brisbane Artist Bruce Reynolds was commissioned to complete artworks for BCEC on Grey Street.  “Art and Place” comprises 5 paintings, 16 wall panels and 6 sculptures.  He makes pictorial objects from linoleum, paint and photography as well as architecturally integrated relief work in concrete and Axminster carpet. Through the use of such materials he pursues his interest in relationships between pattern, history and the built environment.

Read more and view gallery →

Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre’s signature gala event space – the Plaza Ballroom – home to the majority of Brisbane’s premier gala and celebrity events, now proudly showcases what is perhaps the largest artwork on display in Australia.

A painting by the highly regarded Aboriginal artist, Dorothy Napangardi, has been reproduced on to the Ballroom’s new carpet to great effect.

The painting, ‘Sandhills’ was purchased by the Convention Centre from the artist with her blessing for the specific purpose of recreating the artwork on carpet, giving thousands of international and national delegates the opportunity to experience the acknowledged spiritual beauty of Central Desert Art.

The Centre’s Director of Operations, Geoff Hanrahan worked with local designer Carly Perkins to create this spectacular example of carpet art which now adorns 2,000 square metres of the ballroom floor.

‘Sandhills’ portrays the journey of ancestral women to the sacred salt site of Mina Mina, in remote Northern Territory, their home and birthplace of the traditional Indigenous digging stick.

The Centre takes pride in furthering and promoting interest in Australian Indigenous art and from its earliest days has built one of the most significant collections of Central Desert Art. This museum quality collection of Indigenous art is currently on display in the Centre’s permanent art space – the Plaza Gallery.

Brisbane Artist Bruce Reynolds was commissioned to complete artworks for BCEC on Grey Street. “Art and Place” comprises 5 paintings, 16 wall panels and 6 sculptures. He makes pictorial objects from linoleum, paint and photography as well as architecturally integrated relief work in concrete and Axminster carpet. Through the use of such materials he pursues his interest in relationships between pattern, history and the built environment

The Grey Street Ground Floor Foyer, provides the main showcase for his art works, Pamphlet, a work of three components over different media.

“The architectural design is a unifying force for the art work with the building providing an ideal setting and creating a moment where architect and artist come together.”

Pamphlet which is the artist’s largest public art work to date comprises external installations of polyhedral forms or ‘gems’, alcove linoleum collages and scattered relief panels, hand carved with various colourless patterns.

The work is named after Thomas Pamphlet, a convict and castaway who was marooned in Moreton Bay and who led John Oxley to the Brisbane River. In his work, which he describes as ‘ambitious’, Bruce Reynolds draws together the elements of the early settlement of the Brisbane River, the landscape, trade, industry and the current usage of the BCEC on Grey Street site. His ‘Gem’ installations also feature images of South Bank during the 2011 flood.